Lessons From Sperling: ESP With a Supersized E!

Kevin Knight
Kevin Knight

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

I was recently inspired by an article by Heather Hiles about the life of John Sperling, the founder of the University of Phoenix. Sperling was focused on meeting the needs of “nontraditional” students. For ESPers, I think that there are lessons here about “building the workforce of tomorrow” (in the words of Hiles). Continue reading

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Expressing an Opinion Through Scavenger Hunt

Elena Shvidko
Elena Shvidko

And once again—a scavenger hunt!  From my experience—and perhaps I am just lucky—student tend to enjoy activities based on the scavenger hunt idea.  It gives them a chance to do something different from mundane classroom activities.  While accomplishing a task, they also get to interact with each other.  And also, scavenger hunts often require getting up and moving, which brings in a new dynamic to the classroom.

In one of my previous blog posts, I shared a peer review activity based on a scavenger hunt.  Today I would like to describe an activity that can help students express their opinions—both in an oral and a written form. Continue reading

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Free Books for Your Classroom 2: Storybooks Plus Phonics

Tara Arntsen
Tara Arntsen

Almost a year ago, I blogged about one resource, Project Gutenberg, for finding free books for your classroom online, and now it is time for another one. While Project Gutenberg is great because it has so many classics, the site seems to be more appealing to an older audience and, because the copyright has expired on these texts, the language tends to be fairly archaic, and therefore challenging. Children’s Storybooks Online, on the other hand, appears better suited to young and/or lower level students. Continue reading

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ESL Games: True or False?

Marc Anderson
Marc Anderson

The Game: The game True or False? is a fun, interactive game for students to share interesting facts about themselves and to sharpen creative thinking, creative problem solving skills, and listening skills…all  while have fun with the English language. What’s more? Your students will learn more about each other by guessing which statements are true or false about others in the class. This inevitably helps build classroom cohesion. Continue reading

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Yakut TESOL Conference: Reflections on Language and Culture

Luciana de Oliveira
Luciana de Oliveira

This past June, I had the opportunity and honor to represent TESOL at the Yakut TESOL Conference in Yakutsk, in the Siberian region of Russia. The theme of the conference was “Contemporary Issues in EFL Teaching: Teaching Writing by Nonnative English Speaking Teachers for EFL Students.” The conference had around 120 participants, all EFL teachers from around the region. Some had to cross miles and miles to get to Yakutsk, and all seemed to be really happy to be there.

I gave a plenary, titled “Nonnative English-speaking teachers teaching writing at all levels”; two presentations, “A Genre-Based Approach to Writing Instruction” and “About TESOL”; and a workshop, “A Genre-Based Approach to Writing Instruction: Strategies and Tips for Implementation.” Continue reading

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6 Tips for Communicating With Families of ELs

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

For most school districts in the United States, the new school year has begun.  Schools are enrolling an increasing population of immigrant and refugee children in their classrooms. Classroom and content-area teachers will need to meet the challenge of communicating with and engaging the families of their English learners (ELs).

One of our roles as ESL teachers is to facilitate the communication between our school and the family members who are responsible for the care and education of the ELs. EL families may not be familiar with the practice of meeting with their child’s teacher and do not know what is expected of them during such a meeting. Many classroom teachers do not know how to communicate with family members who do not speak English and who are not familiar with U.S. school practices. Continue reading

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Taking Risks in ESP – A Sign of Expertise?

Kevin Knight
Kevin Knight

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

What does it mean to take risks as an ESP practitioner? Is such risk-taking a sign of expertise? This TESOL Blog post is inspired by an article in the area of professional communication that I first read several years ago. The contents of that article are applicable to our work as teachers in a classroom or as trainers in a company:

Candlin, S. (2002). Taking risks: An indicator of expertise? Research on Language and Social Interaction, 15(2), 173–193.

Sally Candlin (spouse of Christopher Candlin, by the way) focuses on expertise in summarizing the contents of her article above: Continue reading

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Getting-to-Know-You Writing Activity: Using Names

Elena Shvidko
Elena Shvidko

In many schools and educational programs around the world, the end of summer is considered to be the beginning of a new academic year.  For us, teachers, this period involves lots of preparation, including designing a course syllabus, developing lessons plans, and thinking about the ways we can engage and motivate our students from the very beginning of the semester. The first day of classes is particularly important, as it introduces students to the material yet to learn, introduces them to their teacher and the classmates, and sets the tone of the course.

Although the first couple of days may be considered introductory, we still should try to provide our students with the opportunity to learn English and use it in meaningful activities.  Today I ‘d like to share a “getting-to-know-you” activity that we can use on the first day of classes. Continue reading

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Take a Virtual Field Trip

Tara Arntsen
Tara Arntsen

While educators are often limited by time, funding, and logistics when it comes to field trips, virtual field trips can make them a real option again. Students get a similar learning experience and teachers can focus on the educational side of things without having to worry about collecting consent forms, tracking money, finding chaperones, etc. Virtual field trips are the way to go and they are gaining in popularity; just Google “virtual field trips” and you will see what I mean, but how do you use a virtual field trip with your class? Read on for a couple of examples.
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ESL Games: ESL – Tic Tac Toe

Marc Anderson
Marc Anderson

The Game: ESL – Tic Tac Toe is a quick, fun way to review any number of grammar forms or vocabulary words. It builds on higher level thinking skills and provides language practice in various skills—primarily listening, speaking, and reading.
Continue reading

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