NoRedInk: For Improved Grammar and Writing

Tara Arntsen
Tara Arntsen

Although I cannot remember how or when I originally heard about NoRedInk, I finally got around to checking it out just the other day and want to encourage you to do the same. NoRedInk is a website designed for teachers that helps students improve their grammar and writing skills. Even if you do not teach a grammar or writing class, NoRedInk is worth looking at because it has the potential to really help students improve their language abilities.

The 90-second video on the homepage clearly lays out why NoRedInk was created, and basically it is because teaching writing is hard. The actual teaching of concepts and assigning of work might not be much different than in other classes, but the grading and feedback is time consuming and tedious. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Guest Speakers in Adult Ed

Robert Sheppard
Robert Sheppard

Guest speakers can make a powerful, lasting impression on students. They share their wisdom and experience, lead by example, and give students a clear, realistic picture of success. I mean, who could forget that time Mr. T came to motivationally speak to our 5th grade class, and for years to come we aspired to be vigilante soldiers of fortune cruising the streets of L.A. in a GMC Vandura trying to clear our names of a crime we didn’t commit?

Okay, so maybe we don’t all remember that. And maybe some dreams are best abandoned.  And maybe some speakers are more effective than others. In this post—the first of two on the topic of guest speakers in adult ed—I’m going to cover some types of guest speakers you may want to consider inviting to your class. Next time, I’ll provide a step-by-step process for prepping inexperienced guest speakers, to make sure that the visit is positive for everyone involved. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Old School Social Media With Inkshedding: A Lesson Plan

Sherry Blok
Sherry Blok

Imagine a world without cell phones. That was my reality when I began teaching ESL more than two decades ago. In those days, students interacted with each other much more than they do today. Today, in any dull moment, they revert to their phones—posting, texting, and tweeting. How can educators compete with social media while trying to create a classroom community? Inkshedding is a beneficial “old school” approach to creating a writing community, which fosters engagement, community, and personal growth. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | 1 Comment

7 Naming Customs From Around the World

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

Immigrant students in the United States  have already suffered the trauma of leaving behind their extended family, friends, teachers, and schools. They enter a U.S. school and can also lose their name. Their name may be deliberately changed by parents or school staff, or an error may be made in the order of the name or its spelling. These mistakes can have lasting effects on students.

A person’s name is part of his or her cultural identity, and it is up to schools to get it right. In order for teachers, administrators, or office staff in your school  to enroll students with the correct the name, they need to understand  the naming conventions of different cultures. Here are seven naming customs from different cultures. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | 8 Comments

Teaching Business English and Project Leadership With Shark Tank

Kevin Knight
Kevin Knight

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

As we move forward with the ESP project leader profiles, I have become increasingly interested in how ESP project leaders get the “buy in” (i.e., support) of stakeholders for ESP projects. In this connection, I have found the TV program Shark Tank to be relevant. In this TESOL Blog post, I share how I have used specific episodes of Shark Tank to teach my students how to more effectively promote their business ideas in English. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Connectivity With Google’s Cultural Institute

Kristen Lindahl
Kristen Lindahl

One of the greatest benefits of being online is the global connectivity it brings—connection to other people, other places, other perspectives, and, of course, other languages. Language teachers have been long aware of the connection between language learning and cultural ties, and are often very creative in bringing culture into the classroom and creating experiences for students outside of it, as well.

A current tool that TESOL educators might find intriguing for these purposes is Google Cultural Institute, which has brought Google’s unique technology to the world’s art galleries and museums. Once you’re on the Institute’s page, you can browse more than 6 million items that range from works of art, photographs, personal items from historical figures, and videos from multiple time periods. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Learning About U.S. Advocacy From an International Perspective

Andy Curtis
Andy Curtis

The TESOL President’s Blog

In 1988, I saw an Eddie Murphy movie called “Coming to America.” At that time, I had not yet made my first trip to the United States, so I was intrigued by how people from other countries would experience America their first time there. Over the last 20 years, I’ve made many trips all over the United States, but as someone who has been based in Canada, in different parts of Asia, in the United Kingdom, and elsewhere for most of my life, I was excited about attending, for the first time, this year’s TESOL Advocacy and Policy Summit, which took place in Washington, DC, on 21–23 June. Approximately 90 TESOL educators attended the summit, which is a reflection of how this event has grown over the years; there were also a few participants from outside the United States, including me. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Advocacy Blog, TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | Leave a comment

Developing Writing Skills Through Personal Journals: Part 2

Elena Shvidko
Elena Shvidko

In today’s blog, I continue describing strategies for keeping a personal journal. In my last blog, I referred to personal journals as a tool for improving writing fluency and overcoming the problem of not knowing what to write about. As I also mentioned, I used this strategy at the suggestion of my writing teacher, and it helped me overcome my writing apprehension.

The issue that some students may face with keeping a personal journal, though, is their lack of experience, or perhaps the mundane character of this practice. So let’s look at some ideas that students can use to find joy in keeping personal journals. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | Leave a comment

Easy Answers for Open-Ended Questions in ELT

Nathan Hall
Nathan Hall

I took a deep breath when I heard the announcement: Our school wanted to emphasize open-ended questions in all classes. Teachers would spend less time asking questions that could be answered with a simple term or a “true/false,” as is the case with closed-ended questions, and instead had to implement more questions designed to assess how well students could describe a process or apply knowledge to write out a more thorough and often subjective passage.

That seemed like a scary situation for my English language learners at first, but then I realized what a great opportunity this was for my students to practice speaking and writing if they could overcome their fears of making mistakes. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | Leave a comment

Discussing Same-Sex Marriage in ELT: A Survey Approach

Alexandra Lowe
Alexandra Lowe

One of my goals as an instructor in an intensive English program (IEP) has been to encourage my students to pay more attention to the news in the United States. (See “Producing Newscasts for the ESL Classroom“) When students watch the news in English, they strengthen their listening skills, expand their vocabulary, and increase their awareness of American culture.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 26 June 2015 ruling on same-sex marriage was one of several “hot topics” in the news this summer that we tackled in class. Beforehand, I wrestled with the question of how best to approach this issue in a class where I knew that a number of students, because of their religious beliefs, might disagree with the Supreme Court’s decision. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments