Problem (Tech) Solved: Disorganization 1

Tara Arntsen
Tara Arntsen

I am certain that there must be model teachers out there that never lose anything, always remember to tell students about assignments, and perfectly perform complex mathematics, like weighted grading, entirely in their heads. For the rest of us, help is here! Continue reading

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Bullying and ELLs: What Teachers Can Do

Kristen Lindahl
Kristen Lindahl

As both children and speakers of other languages, school-age English learners are particularly vulnerable to bullying. This blog helps teachers and teacher educators recognize signs and causes of bullying and presents some steps they can take to prevent it. Continue reading

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Federal Policies Highlight ELLs in Early Education

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

Most of you who have been reading my blog are familiar with Karen Nemeth, who has written many guest blogs over the past few years. Karen is a nationally-known expert on ELLs/DLLs in early childhood education. Please enjoy this review of policy discussions that have taken place over the past year. Many organizations and government offices now use the term dual language learners (DLLs) to refer to all children under the age of 9 years who are learning in two or more languages. For purposes of this article, Karen uses ELLs/DLLs.

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From Languaging to English for Occupational Purposes

Kevin Knight
Kevin Knight

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

I was inspired by Dudley Reynolds’s  TESOL President’s  Blog titled Languaging in a New World.  He writes:

Freeman in a keynote address to the 2014 TESOL international convention laid out a number of pedagogical principles that could be drawn from her work with complexity theory, but she summed them up as the need to teach learners rather than language. This means creating exercises that help students notice and appropriate forms and patterns that work well in their interactions with people and texts.

I could immediately relate to the idea of empowering students not just to learn the language in a textbook but also to develop the language skills needed to achieve the their goals. Continue reading

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Linguicism Simulation Classroom Activity

Shannon Tanghe
Shannon Tanghe

As my previous blog discussed, linguicism, or linguistic discrimination, happens more often than many are aware—in society as a whole, in local communities, and even in school classrooms.  Because it is often overlooked, there is a need for increased awareness. In today’s blog, I share one activity I have used in my teacher education classroom to raise awareness and initiate discussions about language discrimination and its consequences. This activity described is one I have implemented in a World Englishes course in a graduate school of TESOL program in South Korea with adults who were English language teachers pursuing their master’s degree. Continue reading

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Writing A Dissertation: Tips From Former Ph.D. Students, Part 2

Elena Shvidko
Elena Shvidko

In my last blog, I featured three young scholars—second language writers—who shared their suggestions on dissertation writing. In this post, I’d like to continue this topic and include tips from three more former graduate students, who, just like the ones in the last blog, received their doctoral degrees from Purdue University and are now working in different educational settings. Continue reading

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TESOL Board Member Speaks at WATESOL 2016

Guest Author
Guest Author

A guest post by Misty Adoniou
In this blog, Misty Adoniou shares her experience attending and speaking at the 2016 WATESOL Conference, the Universities at Shady Grove, Gaithersburg, MD, 15–16 October.

On Saturday, 15 October, I had the very great honor of opening the WATESOL annual conference in Gaithersburg, Maryland, thanks to the TESOL International Associations Affiliate Speaker Program. This program gives TESOL affiliates the opportunity to have a member of the Board of Directors speak at their annual event.

The theme of the conference was “Making Creative Connections,” and creativity in language is a topic close to my heart, so I was very excited to be invited to speak. Continue reading

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Problem (Tech) Solved: Vocabulary Drills 1

Tara Arntsen
Tara Arntsen

For part two of this little series I have started, let’s take a look at vocabulary, which I feel quite certain has been learned using the same methods for centuries. I know memorization gets a bad reputation these days, but repeated exposure and studying are still important when it comes to learning new vocabulary words. Neither of these is particularly appealing to most students who probably view repeated exposure as redundant and studying as tedious. Continue reading

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Best Practices in TESOL Leadership: An Interview with Naziha Ali, TESOL Arabia Past President

Sherry Blok
Sherry Blok

Past president of TESOL Arabia (2016–2017) Naziha Ali shares her best practices as a leader in TESOL Arabia and discusses the impact of teacher professional development associations on both teachers and employers. Continue reading

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What is a Seal of Biliteracy and How Does it Promote Bilingualism?

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

According to Education Weeks’ Learning the Language Blog,  22 States and the District of Columbia have recognized high school students who have achieved fluency in two or more languages by affixing a Seal of Biliteracy to their high school diploma and/or transcript. This is a movement that began in California in 2012 and has become more prevalent as the number of Dual Language Programs have increased across the United States. Continue reading

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