Tag Archives: education policy

The Unapologetic Advocate in Atlanta

David Cutler
David Cutler

How time flies! It’s almost time for the 2019 TESOL Convention in Atlanta, Georgia! My fourth convention, I’m excited to once again present attendees with an update on U.S. federal policies impacting English learners and teachers on 13 March from … Continue reading

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The Unapologetic Advocate: Know Your Roots

David Cutler
David Cutler

The word grassroots gets thrown around a lot these days. Whether speaking about advocacy or political campaigns, it’s important to know what grassroots means for TESOL advocates and how you can get involved at the local, state, and federal levels. … Continue reading

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Real Advice for Meeting With Your Members of Congress

David Cutler
David Cutler

Well, it’s almost here! No, not my annual Golden Girls marathon, but the first day of the 116th U.S. Congress. And with the new Congress comes an opportunity to meet some of the 435 people who work for you, 110 … Continue reading

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Federal Policies Highlight ELLs in Early Education

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

Most of you who have been reading my blog are familiar with Karen Nemeth, who has written many guest blogs over the past few years. Karen is a nationally-known expert on ELLs/DLLs in early childhood education. Please enjoy this review … Continue reading

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TESOL Educators as Policy Makers

Kristen Lindahl
Kristen Lindahl

It’s an election year in the United States, so U.S. teachers are constantly reminded of their role in the political process and the need to cast their votes for the elected officials that serve them. Often, educators feel like they … Continue reading

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