Exploring Campus Through Writing: A Course Project

Elena Shvidko
Elena Shvidko

Many institutions of higher education offer various types of resources to facilitate English language learners’ success at the university. However, the lack of awareness of these resources, among both faculty and the students, may significantly undermine their value. I believe that teachers are well positioned to help students become familiar with these support services, resources, and programs, so they can become more socialized into the academic community. A writing class, in particular, provides an excellent venue for integrating these resources in course projects and activities. Let me share an example of a project that could be implemented in a writing course. Continue reading

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ESP Project Leader Profile: Elise Geither

Kevin Knight
Kevin Knight

Hello, ESPers worldwide!

The 42nd ESP project leader profile features Elise Geither, who gave a presentation at TESOL 2018 in Chicago in an ESP-EFL (English as a foreign language) intersection session. In addition to being an ESP practitioner, Elise is a multitalented teacher and novelist, who supports students with disabilities: Continue reading

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Why I Refuse to Call My Colleagues “ELL Teachers”

Michelle Benegas
Michelle Benegas

I can hear my grandmother’s voice echoing through her house as she called. “Get your feet off the davenport!” My mother still calls remote controls “clickers.” My siblings and I have found humor in their use of these antiquated terms. In recent years, I’ve found more and more commonality with my grandmother and mother as some of the words in my vocabulary Rolodex are now notably different from the mainstream dialect.

I’m a teacher educator and an applied linguist. Like any progressive linguist, I bristle at those who identify as “grammar snobs,” knowing the colonial and elitist backdrop that such a posture implies. It is because of my deep respect for language evolution and variation, as well as my Midwestern aversion to disruption, that I’ve struggled to voice my dissent on a vernacular change in my field. Continue reading

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Teacher Education InterSections at TESOL 2018

Kristen Lindahl
Kristen Lindahl

One of the most interesting aspects of working as a teacher educator is the various ways it intersects with other aspects of English language education, such as teacher identity development, social responsibility, and the use of technology in formal and informal contexts. For you teacher educators who plan to attend the TESOL International Convention this year in Chicago, the Teacher Education Interest Section has some excellent intersection panels planned for you! Check them out below. Continue reading

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Learning English Through Lyrics

Greg Kessler
Greg Kessler

I thought it might be fun to start this blog out with a song. As most English teachers know, music can be a great way to engage learners to listen extensively and intensively. Music can make learning English fun while allowing teachers to focus on any of these aspects that are relevant to their current teaching. It can provide students with welcome opportunities to listen repeatedly and carefully to understand the English lyrics. Lyrics can be used as a source of authentic language to support the instruction of all language skills. Continue reading

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