Trends in ELT PD: Micro-Credentials

Stephanie Marcotte
Stephanie Marcotte

Micro-credentials are a growing trend in professional development (PD), and they can be found across various teaching and learning contexts. These credentials are personalized, accessible,  shareable, and “stackable” (allowing you to progress on a career path), and they are often rooted in various teaching- and learning-based competencies.

This blog post explores the micro-credential experience, the gamification of PD, free micro-credential opportunities related to English language teaching, and a potential plan to start integrating micro-credentials in your PD planning. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | Leave a comment

The TESOL Research Agenda and Changing Language Landscapes

Jessie Curtis
Jessie Curtis

In keeping with the TESOL Research Agenda as a tool for identifying future directions for inquiry by researchers and practitioners, we consider language learning and teaching and the changing ecological landscapes where they occur. In describing research on language learning and teaching, we identify three main domains of research focus:

  • how individuals, be they students or teachers, develop in and respond to language learning and language use environments, given changing perspectives on what it means to learn an additional language;
  • learning and teaching in community settings, such as classrooms, online social networks, or the workplace; and
  • relations between societal change and language learning and teaching.

In this blog, we highlight research that focuses on changing landscapes for learning and teaching English in the United States and across the globe. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , | Leave a comment

8 Strategies for Teaching Math to English Learners

Judie Haynes
Judie Haynes

Classroom and ESL teachers often discuss difficulties they encounter when teaching math to  English learners (ELs). The first step is to look at the challenges your students face when learning math in English. It’s often said that “math is a universal language,” but in my opinion, it’s not. Teachers need to go beyond teaching students how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide. And even those simple calculations can be taught differently in other cultures. In fact, the cultural backgrounds of our students are rich resources from which mathematical concepts may be developed in English. Here are eight strategies for teaching math to ELs. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , , | Leave a comment

Esports: A Phenomenon Enters the Mainstream—and ELT

Jeff Kuhn
Jeff Kuhn

Wondering how the new experimental card will upend the Overwatch meta? Can anything stop G2’s dominance of LoL’s Summoner’s Rift? Have no idea what any of this means? It’s esports—and it’s becoming the next big thing.

Welcome to another edition of the TESOL games and learning blog! This month, we’ll explore the world of esports, unpacking what it is and what it could mean for your classroom. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , | Leave a comment

Researching Second Language Writing

Betsy Gilliland
Betsy Gilliland

As writing teachers, we read research other people have conducted. During our studies, professors assigned us journal articles and books describing observations of classrooms, analyses of students’ written texts, and interviews with teachers about their work. If you are like I was during my MA degree program (and for many years thereafter), you may have thought research should be large scale, using complicated computer programs to analyze thousands of written texts, or that all research projects should lead to groundbreaking new theories of how we teach and learn to write.

It wasn’t until I started studying for my PhD that I understood how individual teachers without specialized training could conduct meaningful research that was interesting beyond their own classrooms. In this blog post, I briefly review some commonly used methods for researching second language writing and then offer readers recommendations for conducting research themselves. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , | 1 Comment

Diversity ≠ Inclusion: Avoiding Segregative Practices With ELs

Ayanna Cooper
Ayanna Cooper

Often, school communities and workplaces pride themselves for being diverse. I don’t doubt that such pride is valid. We are diverse in many ways. However, lately, diversity has become equated with inclusion—and this is concerning. Diversity does not mean or assure inclusivity. Black History Month, celebrated in February, is an annual remembrance of how the United States has addressed issues of justice and equality, so this month’s blog is dedicated to English learner (EL) program models and how they can include, or unnecessarily exclude, students.

The U.S. Civil Rights Movement, with its landmark cases, affirmed the rights of all students, including ELs. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act (1964) states, “Districts must take affirmative steps to ensure that English learners can meaningfully participate in their educational programs and services.” English language program models are not designed to intentionally violate the civil rights of its students, but it happens. Most would agree that segregation has no place in today’s schools, but again, it happens. Once we know better, do we do better? Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , , | Leave a comment

9 Ways to Create Accessible Educator Office Spaces

Stephanie Marcotte
Stephanie Marcotte

Have you ever stopped to think about your office space? What items do you see? Is this space accessible to everyone who comes to see you? Who is this space designed for? What barriers prevent students from coming to meet with you or accessing the space?

Following, you will find nine questions that ask you to reflect on your office in order to reduce student barriers and increase accessibility—for English language learners specifically and for all students in general. Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog | Tagged as , , , | Leave a comment

Reasons for Becoming a TESOL Ambassador

TESOL Ambassador
TESOL Ambassador

TESOL’s Convention motto, “Where the World Comes Together,” has tremendously affected the presentation I’m giving in Denver. It is a 30-minute practice/pedagogy-oriented session, “Building Transnational Classrooms: From a Testimony to Classroom Practices,” where I invited my former students to present with me.
Continue reading

Posted in TESOL Blog, TESOL Convention Blog | Tagged as , | Leave a comment